Shawn Nesaw

Last month Instagram began offering users the option of switching to a business profile. Doing so provides profiles access to Instagram’s much-anticipated analytics features. Called Insights, these provide a slew of demographic data about followers, and the overall impressions and reach of posts. It’s a great opportunity for businesses to finally wrap their heads around how their Instagram content is performing and the ways they could potentially improve that performance.

We’ve long known that Instagram provides significantly higher engagement rates than other social media platforms. For instance, an analysis of the accounts of the top 50 global brands conducted by Forrester Research in 2015 showed that Instagram delivers over 10 times the engagement of Facebook and over 80 times that of Twitter. Up until now, however, determining who is engaging with our content, when they are most likely to engage with it and what types of content are most appealing to them was difficult. Insights can now answer all those questions for us or, at the very least, go a long way toward helping us figure out the answers ourselves.

Instagram Insights
Here’s a peek at Insights

For starters, Insights will give you graphs breaking down your followers by age, gender and location, the latter of which is a big help in figuring out what time zone you should be basing your posting schedule on. Even more helpful in this respect, however, are graphs that show when your followers are most active, broken down both by day of the week and hour of the day. Now, for instance, you can see your followers are most active on Tuesdays and Thursdays and between the hours of 1-3 p.m.

Insights also provides a selection of your top performing posts, ranked either by reach or engagement. What is particularly useful about this information is the way it’s presented, not in list form, but as a gallery. Presented in this way, it becomes much easier to tease out the common factors contributing to the high performing posts’ success. You might notice all your top posts are images of people. Or maybe you notice they all contain bright blues and greens. Now you can take action and start developing your content so your posts feature more people or specific colors or other characteristics you notice are driving reach and engagement.

Switching to a business profile is easy and can be accomplished from your phone in just a few minutes. Your posts aren’t lost in the process (you’re not starting a new account) and, in fact, you get an additional benefit beyond access to Insights – your business profile will contain a “contact” button that allows followers to easily connect with you via phone or email and even get map directions to your place of business. For brick and mortar businesses, such as restaurants or retail stores, this could certainly help drive sales.

So, while Insights does contain a few odd flaws – for instance, the reach and engagement graphs lack hard numbers, providing only relative data – the benefits are too significant to ignore. Any business wishing to truly maximize their Instagram efforts should definitely make the switch to a business profile. And if, for some reason you decide you don’t like the business profile, switching back is as easy as the initial switch.

A. Bright Idea specializes in strategic social media planning to ensure our clients brand and key messages stay top of mind for their audiences. If your business needs help transferring Insights data into meaningful, strategic next steps, A. Bright Idea is always here to help.

If you have something to add to this story, share it in the comment section below!

ABI_headshot_Seth

Seth covers technology, social media, and strategic communication. Seth is a collaborative strategic communications professional with a breadth of experience in journalism, government affairs, public relations and event planning, Seth manages client communication projects for A. Bright Idea’s West Coast office

Tweet at Seth:  @SethDonlin

Maria Dontas

Business owners are increasingly looking to the Internet for spreading brand awareness, boosting sales and optimizing performance. As a business owner, you’ve likely explored many different digital marketing approaches including social media, online advertising and email newsletters.

But what about SEO?

For many businesses, and especially small businesses with limited resources, the idea of Search Engine Optimization (SEO) is often a completely foreign one, one requiring time that doesn’t exist. Ignoring this key component, however, could cost you a large percentage of web traffic and a lacking digital presence against competitors.

Traffic drives a website.

So, how do searches work?

Considering all the options available to us via the Internet, it’s no wonder most turn to a search engine to help find reliable information most applicable to the question at hand. And while it might seem like those instantaneous search engine results appear through some magical process, it’s really algorithms, or long mathematical formulas, that dictate what information displays. So when you press the “search” button in your search engine of choice, that engine then filters a mammoth amount of material and presents it to you based on quality and popularity of content.

SEO_BLOG_Graphic

So, how do you make your website relevant in filtered search results?

Basically – you have to make the search engines see your value and specifically what value you give to viewers. This relevancy and value depends largely on your website’s content and the effective use of keyword phrases. That means make sure your website’s functionality runs smoothly, using compelling content, and a backend with descriptive meta-tags, or content descriptors that accurately portray your products or services. And don’t forget to make sure your site considers “mobile first” – meaning, the design responds and adapts to the size of the viewers screen. Believe it or not, search engines give higher relevance to sites that integrate these elements into their site. See, it pays off!

Another tip – shared links will boost your popularity, and popularity is a key factor considered by search engines. Make sure your website has a clear message and that it’s geared towards helping visitors answer their questions. In turn, consumers will start sharing your website’s content. Establishing trust and consistency in your online business practices will lead to more shares and more website traction. As the site gains traction, it’ll begin to rank higher in a list of search results. Think of it as the digital equivalent of word-of-mouth advertising.

Put website visitors first.

A well polished website cognizant of its purpose is sure to get on a search engine’s radar. Why? Because, when you put website visitors first, you’re proving your value and to search engines that’s bound to naturally increase your SEO. If you think about it, SEO isn’t much different from any other effort to improve user/audience experience. Keep your website up-to-date, consistent with branding, and teeming with well-written linkable material, and SEO will become an organic digital way to enhance your business.

Remember when media was as simple as TV, radio and the newspaper? Today, it’s no longer just a few platforms in competition. In fact, here are some of the top media platforms competing for audience attention:

  • Television – 85 percent of American’s watch TV
  • Laptop/computer – 68 percent of American’s use a computer
  • Radio – 65 percent of American’s listen to the radio
  • Print (papers/magazines) – 61 percent of American’s read print media
  • Mobile – 55 percent of American’s consume media on their mobile device
  • Tablet – 28 percent of American’s consume media on their tablet device

* Source: http://www.americanpressinstitute.org/publications/reports/survey-research/personal-news-cycle/

That’s just a glimpse of what forms of media advertising are available. Now consider cable, satellite radio, Internet radio, online and website advertising, social media and more. It’s enough to make you cringe when thinking of the numerous methods available today to reach your audience. It’s also very easy for organizations to lose sight of their strategic focus when facing this increasingly fragmented advertising world. A business’ strategic approach needs to focus on their goals, their target audience and their methods of consumption, as well as a specific call-to-action that will impact that audience.

Developing an integrated and strategic communications approach, including multiple media touch points, as well as incorporating other forms of marketing and public relations allows businesses to create an impression with the audience by using fragmentation as an advantage. By focusing on the underlying goals and creating a specific and strategic approach, unique and targeted advertising opportunities exist to brand an organization and still maintain a reasonable budget.

In the instance of advertising, the point you should always consider before implementing a campaign – it’s better to buy 100 ads spread across five platforms reaching 50 percent of your audience if the total is 500,000 impressions than 100 ads on one platform reaching 75 percent of your audience if the total is 10,000 impressions. Taking into consideration consumer habits and consumption, having your campaign run in multiple forms of media may give the impression of a larger spend, hit the consumer on multiple platforms, and build the brand confidence by being included on media that the consumer already values or is loyal to.

Because of fragmentation, programmatic media buying driven by data continues to change media buying, pushes pricing and limits availability. We specifically combat this for clients by finding unique ways to break through that clutter while maximizing your budget, targeting the right audience for your goals and driving your key messages and calls-to-action for results.

If it’s time to evaluate your approach and ensure you’re using fragmentation to your advantage, call us for a marketing audit and analysis!

PersNewsCycle-Exhibit_01

http://www.americanpressinstitute.org/publications/reports/survey-research/personal-news-cycle/

Using Instagram video for your business

abimaster | September 24, 2013

instagram videoInstagram recently implemented a video feature, taking the once still image only platform to a new level. Instagram video allows users to take a 3 to 15 second clip of anything they want, stopping and starting a video recording whenever they feel; so that you do not have to record the video clip all at once. It also includes a filter feature and a video stabilization option, a feature that put Instagram on the map when it was first introduced.

What at first felt like another version of the highly similar video-only social media outlet Vine, Instagram video has erupted as a strategic marketing tool. The Vine platform limits users to 10 seconds. Many companies use their 15 seconds to capture the users’ attention and provide an interactive glimpse at what services they have to offer. Many retailers are giving behind-the-scenes glimpses of sales and new products while some producers are posting shortened movie trailers. Businesses are finding new ways of reaching consumers as Instagram video transforms marketing methods.

For more information on the newest social media trend and how to integrate it into your marketing strategy, send us an email to our Multimedia Manager, David Wells, at david@abrightideaonline.com.

Super Bowl Commercials

This year’s Super Bowl commercials may have covered a variety of themes from sexy models to cute kids, wacky animals to celebrity cameos, but there’s one thing they all had in common – user generated content and a call-to-action for the audience via social media.

Even before the big game, advertisers were using social media to reveal sneak peeks of their upcoming ads to capitalize on the excitement and build brand buzz through custom hashtags, Facebook pages and websites. Some hashtags trending prior to and during Sunday’s game included:

Audi: #BraveryWins

VW: #GetHappy

Pepsi: #PepsiHalftime

Toyota: #WishGranted

Coke: #CokeShowgirls #CokeBadlanders #CokeCowboys #CokeChase

Doriots: #CrashTheSuperBowl

Samsung: #TheNextBigThing

Mio: #ChangeStuff

Axe: #InSpace

Budweiser: #Clydesdales

Budlight: #HereWeGo

GoDaddy: #YourBigIdea

Pistachios: #CrackinStyle

Speed Stick: #HandleIt

Tide: #MiracleStain

 

When it came time for the big reveal there were a few commercials that really stole the show by utilizing social and interactive media well, generating a greater connection among the audience and brand.

Oreo
Which is the best part – the cream or the cookie? Oreo’s hilarious whisper commercial called on viewers to ‘choose your side’ through Instagram. The Oreo Instagram account shows images of just about anything made out of either the cream filling or the cookie, inviting viewers to add their own image with the tag #cookiethis or #creamethis. Oreo may recreate the item using your favorite part of the Oreo.

Oreo

Taco Bell
What do retirement age seniors like to do after a night of partying? Go to Taco Bell of course! The surprise storyline in this commercial, all set to the Spanish version of Fun’s, ‘We Are Young,’ works well with Taco Bell’s current “Live Más” campaign. The fast food restaurant invites the audience to go to their Facebook page for coupons, photos and more.

 

Coca-Cola
Coke had previewed their commercial featuring the showgirls, badlanders and cowboys racing to the coveted beverage well before the big game. The beverage company encouraged viewers to go online to vote for the ending of the commercial to air during the Super Bowl. At their custom website, viewers voted for their favorite group, while at the same time sabotaging the other two groups by sharing their selection on Facebook or Twitter. In the end the #CokeShowgirls came out on top and had the privilege to ‘open happiness.’

 

Pepsi
As sponsor of the halftime show, Pepsi called on viewers to submit photos for a chance to be a part of the performance intro. The user-generated content introduced Beyonce while associating the brand with a direct connection to their audience.

 

Axe Apollo Space Academy
The lifeguard may have saved the distressed woman from a shark attack, but nothing beats an astronaut. The Axe Apollo commercial included the element of surprise, while also announcing a special contest where viewers can actually win a trip to space. The new Axe Apollo has teamed with SpaceExc to send a few select winners to fly into orbit. With a custom website and hashtag #InSpace, Axe Apollo certainly caught the audience’s attention with a creative commercial and turned it into social media engagement.

 

Budweiser
The Budweiser Clydesdale commercials are classic, and this year the beverage allowed you to tweet @Budweiser with the hashtag #Clydesdales to help name the baby Clydesdale seen in the commercial. The commercial certainly tugs at the heartstrings, showing the man’s horse running to see him at the very end – what love! Who wouldn’t want to jump on Twitter to name that beautiful horse?

Budweiser

Doritos
Doritos, which has claimed a #1 spot in recent online commercial rankings, deployed its “Crash the Super Bowl” campaign again, gathering user-generated commercials and inviting the audience to vote on their favorite commercials to air during the big game. The “Goat for Sale” was our favorite!

 

Lincoln
The Lincoln “Road Trip” commercial encouraged viewers to ‘steer the script’ and see what the ending brings. They also asked viewers to tweet about their most memorable road trips – although big miss for Lincoln – no Twitter handle or hashtag was included in the commercial. How do we know how to categorize our tweet?

 

Mercedes-Benz
In the Mercedes Benz spot, Kate Upton invites you to go to MercedesBenzUSA on Facebook to see the all-new seductive CLA Benz coming in September. The commercial is a pure glitz and glam display with celebrities like Kate Upton and Usher, but captures the audience with an affordable price point.

 

Samsung
The comical interaction between Paul Rudd and Seth Rogen was entertaining, as was the direct approach to call out other advertisers gimmicks. The commercial showcased smartphone and tablet devices, while utilizing #TheNextBigThing and social tools through the devices.

 

It couldn’t be expected, but advertisers also took advantage of the unique opportunity the game’s third-quarter blackout provided, jumping quickly on social media with real-time Twitter campaigns. Oreo, Tide, Bud Light, Audi, VW and Speed Stick—were some of our favorites.

  • Oreo – “You can still dunk in the dark”
  • Tide – “We can’t get your blackout. But we can get your stains out”
  • Audi – Told its followers they were sending some of their LED headlights to the Superdome (which is sponsored by competitor Mercedes-Benz)

 

Notable Mentions
While the below commercials didn’t necessarily include social media, they were still some of the most talked about in social media.

  • Jeep: A tug at the heartstrings, welcoming home troops – “Whole Again”
  • Ram: Guts. Glory. Ram. – “God made a farmer”
  • E*TRADE: Smart talking baby tells you to – “Save It”
  • Tide: A 49ers fans glory squashed at the hands of a Ravens fan (much like the big game!) “Miracle Stain”

Baltimore Ad Week 2011

abimaster | September 16, 2011

Baltimore Advertising Week gives us an excuse to talk about one of our favorite things in this town – advertising. After 15 years of working with small to mid-size businesses, government clients and non-profits struggling to get their message out, it’s refreshing to discuss new and innovative approaches with our peers downtown and experts from across the country alike.

Sure, the art of marketing still relies on the basics of research and strategy and budgets can still be a big piece of the puzzle. But with the rate of emerging technology coupled with the rate of adoption, the options and opportunities for engaging with your audience are simply exciting.

Now we can target our audience wherever they go, right through their own mobile devices. Marcus Startzel of Millennial Media provided some insight on “How to Succeed in Mobile.” A few take-aways we found interesting:

  • Mobile advertising hones in on demo, geography and immediacy, even day-parting ads
  • Mobile traffic patterns – low between 3-4 a.m., increasing through 11 p.m. and highest on weekends. PC traffic dies at 5p.m., Monday- Friday.
  • Digital/mobile advertising holds 8.1% share of voice against other mediums
  • Who’s spending in mobile? Retail, restaurants, finance, directories
  • How are mobile advertisers targeting? Broad reach, local market, demo, pay scale
  • Types of mobile advertising – text, direct response, click to call, point-of-sale
  • Geo-targeting focuses on physical location of cell phones, not registered location of user
  • 59% of mobile ads go to touch screen phones, allowing more creativity of ad
  • Ever notice an ad appearing after you searched on the same topic? That’s not coincidence; it’s geo-targeting
  • eReaders are ripe for advertising, however there needs to be enough in the market for advertisers & developers to invest
  • Smaller businesses who may not have the client list or funds to support a large mobile marketing campaign are encouraged to stay on top of other mobile trends such as utilizing QR codes.

Even as organizations continue to take the leap into social media, there are legal considerations – not necessarily from transparent communications, but based on ethical communications. A discussion led by Jim Astrachan, Principal of Astrachan, Gunst Thomas, P.C., explained the new Federal Trade Commission (FTC) rules and guidelines concerning social media and those favorable reviews an organization craves:

  • Social media marketing accounts for a $4 billion market in 2011
  • Abuse/deception under the FTC rules includes paying employees of a company to post favorable reviews and comments about that companies products; employees hyping a companies products; and paying employees to pose as street teams to enhance a product. All of these practices are not illegal if you disclose the people work for the company—but this discredits the value of the endorsements.
  • Advertisers are now obligated to monitor and police the endorsers.
  • Even if employees are truly satisfied about a company product, they cannot post and praise the products if they do not disclose their relationship because they have a financial interest.
  • If an employee lists their employer on their Facebook or Twitter page, that is sufficient disclosure.
  • Companies can encourage others to tweet about their products, but cannot reward them later, i.e. ‘Show us proof of your tweet and receive a discount on your next visit/purchase.’
  • Facebook vs. MaxBounty – a case involving alleged misleading advertising on Facebook by MaxBounty. The company is said to help create fake Facebook campaigns, providing advance payments if its clients agree to participate. MaxBounty also tells the company’s Facebook approves these campaigns. A result is yet to be determined.
  • All in all, the answers aren’t always clear—be conscious of your social media interaction and use.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

iPhone Apps and Marketing

abimaster | May 31, 2011
Popular iPhone Apps

It seems that everyday someone new jumps on the iPhone or iPad bandwagon; talking about their new apps and the innovative and exciting capability they just acquired. Companies and agencies recognize this new medium to reach consumers, and some even created their own apps. But the true question is – how to do it effectively?

How can an organization reach their target audience through an app? It must be useful and optimize the brand all at the same time.

When contemplating the best way to launch an iPhone app, consider these suggestions to boost its success.

1) Clearly identify the target audience, and expectations
Like any marketing plan, identify the target audience and outline the expectations and objectives. Creating an app reaches an entirely new audience, and this form of mobile marketing is interactive, driven to cause consumers to act. Most importantly, do not confuse your wants with your target audience’s expectations. Ensure that your app clearly adheres to your brand.

2) Optimize your App’s Name
Recognize the importance of creating a concise name that communicates the purpose of your app to your target audience. Be clever and creative to cut through the static but hold true to what your app delivers.

Incorporate keyword phrases into description copy. Because pages get indexed within iTunes and then ranked by major search engines, do not use the app or company in the keyword descriptions. Utilize auto-suggested keywords since these optimize the search functionality.

3) Blog about it
Create buzz around the new app by blogging. Bloggers create a cyber environment that discusses the functions of the app, what it does and why they like it. Try and get ahead of the curve and start your own blogs before others begin writing about it. Create positive messaging and lay the groundwork for other bloggers and traditional media outlets.

4) Plan, Plan, Plan
Plan how to measure success of your app. Whether this involves financial success or overall awareness and recognition of your brand, a carefully crafted plan must be implemented and results monitored.

Now that we’ve shared our thoughts about creating apps, check out some of A. Bright Idea’s favorites:

• Trover
• Photosynth
• Facebook
• Pandora
• Fooducate
• Mashable!
• WalletZero

How to improve your social media efficiency

abimaster | January 19, 2011
Melissa Mauldin, Senior Marketing Specialist

While many businesses have decided to get their feet wet in the realm of social media (and yes, some are still hesitant), it’s apparent that some businesses do so without proper planning. Lack of planning causes wasted time and often includes inefficient methods. Social media, like any form of marketing for a business, must involve strategy.

As we all learned from the popularization of social media in 2009 and the enhancement of the medium in 2010, social media can be a truly efficient and effective way to communicate to stakeholders on a different level. It’s no longer a “new” medium, rather it is broadly being incorporated into business marketing plans and is a sought after resource in communicating businesses key messages, events, and product news and promotions directly with customers.

I recently came across a blog on socialmediatoday.com indicating the 12 reasons why businesses will fail at social media in 2011. Overall, many of the issues stemmed around businesses not incorporating social media as part of their strategic marketing plan. Rather, businesses attempted to use the medium because they thought they should get on board. Wrong. Below are a few tips to keep in mind to help businesses utilize this popular medium efficiently.

Understand the medium.

Social media is not a tool that’s going to fix a broken business or be the answer to down sales or a poor reputation. Social media will actually enhance these issues, if not conducted properly. Businesses need to have a true understanding of the medium and have a strategy in place before engaging.

Plan, plan, plan.

Businesses without a plan will fail. Otherwise known as Random Acts of Social Medial, or RASMs, no one can afford to waste time. Avoid the randomness and develop a strategy and appropriate messaging for utilizing this tool as part of your overall marketing plan. Think about the big picture as well as the logistics involved in the strategy. (i.e. What is our key message? Is our messaging appropriate for the audience? How much and how often? Will we develop any special events/promotions for this audience only? Who will manage our presence on social media sites? Who will have access? Do we have the manpower to devote one person to manage social media activity? If not, how can the workload be divided?)

Don’t expect too much too early.

Certainly, online resources provide data and feedback immediately upon entering this world. However, it takes time to understand the environment, engage with the audience and build a following that will respond, before determining the success or failure of this resource.

So, have you planned your social media participation strategically? This year, get on board with a strategic goal and action plan that’s in line and in support of your marketing efforts. Social media can help contribute to building your brand, as part of your overall marketing plan. Ensure you’re messaging correctly and devoting the resources needed to be successful in this ever-changing and continuously evolving medium. Don’t waste time.  There never seems to be enough anyway!

David Wells, Junior Marketing Specialist/ Photographer

If you are an avid online shopper, you’ve probably heard about Cyber Monday, or at least see it splashed across the subject lines of emails from your favorite stores. Cyber Monday falls on the Monday following Thanksgiving and Black Friday, and refers to an online shopping day on which stores offer great online deals and discounts. A shopper who saw his or her favorite gifts in the stores over the weekend, but didn’t wake up early enough to snag one, can hit online sites to place their holiday orders – without all the lines and maybe even with free shipping.

While Black Friday allows stores to generate millions of dollars from the crazy amount of shoppers that bombard their stores, major retailers recently began to acknowledge the online shopping habits of their customers to get the real boost in revenue on Cyber Monday.

According to comScore, Inc. – a global leader in measuring the digital world – last year Cyber Monday alone generated $887 million, a five percent increase from 2008, and a number that matched the heaviest online shopping day ever- December 8, 2008. Since 2005, online shopping on Cyber Monday has increased over $425 million.

What’s funny about this, at least to me, is that 52.7 percent of Cyber Monday shopping was from work computers, a gain of 2.3 percentage points from the previous year. According to CareerBuilder, employers lost $580 million in productivity on Cyber Monday in 2008. They estimate that 43 percent planning to shop on Cyber Monday will spend at least one hour doing so from their workplace computer.

Some companies believe this is a moot point to try to stop employees from shopping from work, and some even encourage it. Employers would rather let an employee shop from their computer for an hour, then spend an extra long lunch break fighting the shopping crowds and traffic in the stores. Also, some employers believe it improves morale in the workplace by allowing employees to spend a little work time for personal use.

Online shopping and e-commerce sites have only been around since the mid 1990s and rapidly continue to grow. E-commerce and online sales sold more than $160 billion worth of merchandise in 2009.

We’ll have to wait and see if the trend for online shopping continues to grow this year as more and more consumers utilize new technologies and the Internet. This year, will the greatest volume of Cyber Monday shopping come from smartphones? Enough about the numbers, time to shop!

My love and hate of modern technology

abimaster | October 18, 2010
David Wells, Junior Marketing Specialist

I recently returned from a 10 day whirlwind trip to Europe with visits to Dublin, London, Paris and Rome. Although I could write about a million different topics or events, including the crazy drivers and insane amount of mopeds, people knowing how to speak more languages than I could wish for, how everything is just plain older, how Europeans travel way more than Americans, how Europeans work way less than Americans, or how I probably looked like an idiot sprinting through Kings Cross Station in London to catch my train to Paris. Instead, I really want to write about my love and hate of modern technology.

I am a photographer by nature. I love taking pictures, and I take pictures of anything and everything. I started taking pictures many years ago using film cameras, and have used all kinds of cameras since then. I’m pretty savvy when it comes to technology, especially cameras, so figuring out how to use each one is never a hard task. I’m the person my friends come to when they are having trouble with their camera or want to know how to shoot a picture on a certain setting, or which setting would work best. In the days of film and disposable cameras, you thought about each and every shot you took and spaced out your clicks because you had a definite limitation to the number of pictures you could take. I didn’t really have such a limitation on my 10-day trip, but probably could have used one.

Ten days. How many pictures do you think I took? If you guessed in your head, you’re probably wrong, and you probably underestimated.

I took more than 2,600 pictures on my Canon SLR. That does not include the pictures and videos on my Kodak waterproof camera or the images I deleted on the fly if I knew I didn’t like the shot. This amount of pictures used over nine gigabytes of memory. I know… I have a problem.

I encountered lots of interesting things to take pictures of in these incredible cities, but, it was still too many pictures.

Modern technology is great because you can sort of take an unlimited amount of pictures and don’t need to worry how many pictures of the same thing you take (ahem, Eiffel tower), because you can just choose your favorite one later and delete the rest.

Thankfully, with all the advancements in computers, cameras and the internet, I can take this amount of pictures, not worry about the cost of prints, and share over the internet via multiple social media outlets including Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, blogs like this and more.

While I still appreciate an actual printed photograph, accessing all of your old pictures is becoming a lot easier with a few clicks of a mouse without digging through boxes, piles or albums of photographs.

Now we get to why I hate modern technology. It takes an incredible amount of time to download, sort and edit all of these photos! And, who wants to look at that many pictures anyway? Even I got sick of going through them and I was the one on the trip! I’m still working on narrowing this number down to a manageable amount so I can share with my family and friends, and by that time, no one will care about my trip anymore.