Shawn Nesaw

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A few years ago, including compelling photos with your social media posts to increase impressions was the top trend. Today, video is the best way to engage an audience. In fact, about one third of all online activity is spent watching video, according to Hubspot.   

In part two of this series covering live streaming video, we will dive deeper into advice on how to use Periscope to grow a stronger following on social media. These tips can be applied to the live streaming service of your choice.

  1. Let your audience be your guide. Knowing which social platform to use for your live streaming content comes from understanding where your audience lives. Jumping on a trend for the sake of taking part is not always advisable. Take the message to your audience; don’t make them come to you. Introduce your business into the conversation and the audience will appreciate the effort of your engagement. Research the audience and their behaviors, engage in the platform and evaluate for effectiveness before fully committing resources to the platform.
  2. Be strategic. Have a plan of what you’re going to share and know the strategy behind your decision to share. You only get one crack at posting live content so think through the process strategically, like you would if you were producing a high-end video for network television. Our team often plans live streaming videos around our social media calendar. Once we’ve chosen the best topics for live streaming, we plan out a rough script of talking points, noting plans for setting and props. We walk through the general flow of the video, discussing main points, reviewing questions and adjusting any lighting or background noise before tapping “Go Live.”
  3. Don’t fear spontaneity. Opportunities to “Go Live,” which are not planned, do arise and you should take advantage of these moments. We’ve found these moments are usually experiences many clients, business partners and followers of A. Bright Idea don’t typically get a chance to witness. One team member broadcasts the event from their mobile device and responds to comments during the broadcast. Posting unplanned, unscripted content can be scary at first, but with a steady hand and confidence, you will allow your audiences to experience the human side of the business, giving viewers an even more intimate experience with your brand.
  4. Don’t force it. Periscope should be used when it makes sense. It shouldn’t be forced into a weekly or monthly content calendar. Our team utilizes a content calendar to ensure we’re continually providing information about our industry to all audiences on the platform in which they engage. We might pick one or two events per month for Periscope. If there’s a lot going on in a given month, we might use Periscope more than twice. Do what’s comfortable for your business.
  5. Steady as she goes. Using a tripod with a phone mounting system will help keep the image your viewers are seeing clear and steady. We like Joby’s GripTight Mount. The tripod also allows you to not be glued to your phone during a broadcast giving you the freedom to move around and show hands-on demo of products for example.  

Here are a few engaging Periscope content ideas to get you started.

  1. Q & A  – If you want your audience to get to know you better, hold a weekly or monthly Q & A session, where the audience submits questions and you answer them live.
  2. Live tour – Do you have a newly decorated office space? Periscope a live tour of the office, answering questions as you go.
  3. Sneak peak – Are you launching a new product? Give a sneak peek of production to boost interest.
  4. Business culture – Do you want to show audiences what it’s like to work on your team? Scope a meeting, in-office party (until things get wild) or any other aspect of your business culture.
  5. Community event – Allow audiences to experience what you do as a team outside of work. Whether it’s running a 5K or having a company cookout, people enjoy being part of your culture.

Entering unknown social media territory can be daunting. Our team of strategic communicators specializes in public relations, including social media strategy and implementation. If you’re looking to boost your social media outreach but have reservations or are unsure where to begin, we can help.

If you have something to add to this story, share it in the comment section below!

Ben Ford

2 min read

By Ben Ford

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On a hot summer morning in late July, at Fort Detrick, Maryland, the generals inspected the assembled troops, standing in formation.

A distant siren faded. Except for the buzz of insects and jets high overhead, silence had fallen over Blue and Gray Field where the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command’s (USAMRMC) Change of Command ceremony took place.

The ceremony had reached a stage rife with tradition and symbolism. Command Sgt. Maj. David M. Rogers presented the command’s colors to outgoing commander Maj. Gen. Brian C. Lein. With a deliberate turn, Lein passed the colors to his superior Lt. Gen. Nadja Y. West, the U.S. Army Surgeon General, who held it firmly in her hands. With precision, she turned and gave the colors to Maj. Gen. Barbara R. Holcomb, who took it firmly with her hands. Holcomb turned on her heel and passed the colors back to Rogers.28704086895_8b8214aeb9_z

The ceremony marked the start of a new commander while it paid homage to the continuity of the command. As the generals marched in line back to the reviewing stand, a slight smile of pride crossed Holcomb’s face as she passed her family and friends. The USAMRMC is a command filled with dedicated military and civilian researchers who strive to carry out the mission priorities of “Protect, Project, Sustain.” From researching new battlefield medical techniques and equipment to fighting the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, USAMRMC is at the forefront of providing medical care to those who serve the Nation and the world.

Holcomb, Lein, West and the Soldiers who passed in review take great pride, and rightly so, in their work for USAMRMC. As an agency that provides contract support to the organization, A. Bright Idea assists the command’s public affairs office in a variety of ways, offering writing support for technical articles and speeches, as well as photography support and graphic design.

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While ABI’s purple flag did not fly at the ceremony, our ‘Bright Lights” always feel a sense of pride knowing we provide assistance to those carrying out such important, lifesaving missions for the people of our country and around the world.

 

If you have something to add to this story, share it in the comment section below!

 

Photos by Crystal Maynard, USAMRMC Public Affairs

 

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Ben Ford writes for A. Bright Idea covering government and healthcare industries. He began his career in journalism working as a writer and later editor of several news publications. He has won numerous awards for his writing from the Maryland-Delaware-District of Columbia Press Association.

Twitter_Logo_White_On_Blue @Ben_abrightidea

 

 

 

 

 

Shawn Nesaw

 

If you haven’t already noticed, live streaming video is becoming a popular feature throughout most social media platforms. If you watch carefully on Facebook, Twitter, or even TV, you’ll see evidence that live streaming is THE way brands are reaching millennials and is an increasingly common way for people to share important life events with their family and friends.

This blog is the first of a three part series focused on live streaming video, specifically Periscope. We’ll discuss the rise of live streaming on social media, how to use live streaming video apps most effectively for personal and business use and take a look at how live streaming is used in crisis communication efforts.

A BRIEF HISTORY LESSON

Periscope pioneered the idea of sharing in-the-moment video through a social platform. It was then acquired by Twitter and launched in March 2015. Two months later, Meerkat, a live streaming competitor, released its live streaming app and for the next year, the two led the social sphere in providing live streaming capabilities online. Less than one year later, Facebook launched its Facebook Live feature and continues to see success in the market by providing a live streaming feature in its own way. To recap, in just over one year, live streaming video became the “next big thing” and since then, everyone is trying to catch up and figure out how to utilize the newest, driving force in social media marketing.

 

Meerkat, Periscope, Facebook

 

These three live streaming video platforms, Meerkat, Periscope and Facebook, all take advantage of one thing most of us carry with us every day, mobile devices. People keep their phones or tablets with them all the time, which allows anyone to broadcast anything, anytime, from anywhere. While there’s certainly still a place for edited, quality video; unedited, raw video is becoming more popular by the day – not only for the individual user but for brands as well.

If you’re not on the bandwagon yet, no worries – live streaming video is still catching on. For the majority of people, Facebook remains the go-to for social media. Sharing on Facebook is a pretty normal part of life these days. Live video on the other hand is something completely different. Questions we often hear regarding Periscope or Facebook Live video usually sound something like: “Why share?” “How do you decide what to share?” or simply, “How did you do that?” As communicators, we’re always looking to utilize the newest and most progressive technology to share our message and we know live video can be simple, fun and effective.

Recently, A. Bright Idea started using Periscope to engage our audience as well as our own team, allowing everyone to experience our culture, whether it’s a creative brainstorm or an after work event. What we’ve noticed is this: there are a lot of untapped audiences out there who might not understand what live video is or how it can be helpful. We plan to shed some light on that and more in this series. Next up in this blog series, we’ll share what we’ve learned from using Periscope and some tips for using a live streaming platform effectively to benefit communication efforts to further engage an audience.

If you have something to add to this story, share it in the comment section below!

With a continual focus of adding top talent to our award-winning team, A. Bright Idea is excited to announce the addition and promotion of our new team members to support the creative communication needs of our clients.

 

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Top from left: Kevin Hess, Crystal Maynard, Robyn Hicks; Center from left: Brian Lobsinger, Luz Esmeralda Mahecha Martínez; Bottom from left: Bridget Goldsmith, Mina Ta

 

Mina Ta

A. Bright Idea Advertising & PR is pleased to announce the promotion of Mina Ta to a senior creative position. Mina, who joined A. Bright Idea in November 2013, demonstrated strength and leadership in providing on-site creative support for an Arlington, Virginia-based government client.

 

Bridget Goldsmith

Bridget joins A. Bright Idea Advertising & PR as part of a team of graphic designers supporting a government client in Arlington, Virginia. Bridget held previous positions as a contractor for the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration and the NAVSEA Ship Building Program at the U.S. Navy Yard. Prior to joining A. Bright Idea, Bridget worked as a graphic designer for the U.S. Army Office of the Chief of Public Affairs at the U.S. Pentagon where she developed the overall branding for the nation’s highest medal for valor, the United States Army Medal of Honor.

 

Brian Lobsinger, Senior Designer/Multimedia Specialist

A. Bright Idea Advertising & PR welcomed Brian Lobsinger to the Graphic Design team, as senior designer and multimedia manager. Brian is charged with managing design and web projects in both the Sonoma, California and Bel Air, Maryland offices. Prior to A. Bright Idea, Brian ran his own design firm, and most recently was the senior web developer at Flannel, Inc.

  

Crystal Maynard, Communications Specialist

Crystal Maynard joins A. Bright Idea’s Government Services Division, offering on-site support for a government client in managing a variety of communication and public affairs projects. Crystal offers extensive communications experience, previously serving as a public affairs specialist to U.S. Army clients, providing strategic planning, media relations, event planning and public relations support.

 

Luz Esmeralda Mahecha Martínez, Bilingual Communications Specialist

Luz joins A. Bright Idea Advertising & PR in the Government Services Division, providing on-site communications and translation support for the Public Information office of an existing government client. Prior to joining A. Bright Idea, Luz worked with the University of Maryland School of Public Health and Miami Dade College School of Continuing Education and Professional Development.

 

Kevin Hess, Communications Event Specialist

Kevin Hess joined A. Bright Idea Advertising & PR to support marketing and event coordination efforts for the firm’s government and commercial clients. Kevin joins this award-winning team offering event planning and management experience from the Sports Information Office at Towson University.

 

Robyn Hicks, Junior Graphic Design Specialist

Robyn Hicks recently joined award-winning Graphic Design team at A. Bright Idea Advertising & PR. Robyn, a Towson University graduate with a degree in digital fine arts and design, previously worked with the Harford County Boys and Girls Club as a graphic designer.

 

Katie MacNichol

By: Katie MacNichol, Assistant Director of Advertising & PR

Considering how brands can most effectively and efficiently engage customers, the recent webinar hosted by Social Media Today – Moving from Screen to Device and Back Again: The Omni-Channel Experience – focused on an omni-channel communication campaign approach versus one with a multi-channel concentration.

First, what does omni-channel mean and how does it differ from multi-channel?

  • Omni-channel – a well executed implementation of communication that provides a continuity of experience; how does each medium build on the others to continue the customer’s seamless and optimized experience
  • Multi-channel – communicating the same message across many different mediums with no particular focus on seamlessness

Ultimately, omni-channel focuses on the continuation of experience, whereas multi-channel focuses on frequency without necessarily growing the customer experience with the brand.

Within the webinar, Social Media Today highlighted five important steps for transitioning from a multi-channel approach to an omni-channel one, including:

  • Consider the customer journey
  • Identify the contributing elements
  • Identify the friction points
  • Identify the enablers (ones that can help to remove friction points)
  • Perform and audit capabilities (then fill in the gaps of the customer journey)

As strategic professionals, we use these steps at A. Bright Idea to better build plans that break silos and avoid segmenting a customer’s journey. This focus ensures all messaging, tools and tactics focus on the brand story and build webs, not funnels.

For example, when communicating to an audience segment a campaign should build a web of options for individuals to select how they want to learn about and/or engage with the brand. This provides the audience with choices, rather than a funnel approach, which only gives one hub and limits the audience’s options for engagement.

Most importantly in addition to these considerations, as with any communication campaign, research remains an important initial step, while also always keeping in mind the end-user and segmenting audiences in order to develop strategy that focuses on unique needs. Considering segments and pulling from research adds to the idea of “social care” – connecting with each audience segment where they already are (i.e. Twitter or Facebook versus a traditional call center).

Each of these elements come together to ensure an omni-channel approach to communicating a brand message to audiences remains most effective and efficient in creating an ever-growing experience, versus one that doesn’t expand past the initial engagement or provide anything of additional value to the customer.

Building Brand Loyalty Through Visual Media

abimaster | August 5, 2014

Marketing businesses using Facebook and Twitter has become a growing tactic in marketing plans across all industries. Social media platforms serve as an effective tool for circulating branded messaging, but Internet usage and trends continue to change every day.

In a recent article, Bulldog Reporter found that 90% of all Internet traffic and 50% of mobile traffic is now made up of photos and video. For growing visual media platforms like Instagram and Pinterest, this means an opportunity for continued expansion. Instagram’s more than 200 million users make up an attractive market of young people for PR and marketers. Digital media reporting site Mashable has also found that 1 in 5 U.S. adults are now using Pinterest. These large groups of users of both platforms are at the ready to receive visual content that could ultimately lead to better connecting and capitalizing on consumer and brand relationships.

With the expanding use of visual media, it is more important than ever to control your brand’s messaging. People make decisions based on trust and brand promise. Using photos and visuals helps create another tangible connection to brands. As we can see from these recent statistics, it is becoming a greater means of communication – that old adage “a picture’s worth a thousand words.” Having a strategic presence in visual media can serve as a key tool to further brand development as part of an integrated marketing approach. Everything you do or say influences what people think about your brand, so providing them with a visual example of what your brand promises also helps demonstrate that your brand delivers on this promise.

No matter the medium, the ability to connect users with your brand is crucial to developing brand loyalty, and will ultimately lead to a better consumer experience. It’s important to assess your own brand strategy as it compares to trends, as not all trends serve brands equally. With the expanding use of visual media, now is an opportune time to analyze your own brand and consider the most strategic uses of visual media and how it can potentially become part of your integrated marketing approach.

Remember when media was as simple as TV, radio and the newspaper? Today, it’s no longer just a few platforms in competition. In fact, here are some of the top media platforms competing for audience attention:

  • Television – 85 percent of American’s watch TV
  • Laptop/computer – 68 percent of American’s use a computer
  • Radio – 65 percent of American’s listen to the radio
  • Print (papers/magazines) – 61 percent of American’s read print media
  • Mobile – 55 percent of American’s consume media on their mobile device
  • Tablet – 28 percent of American’s consume media on their tablet device

* Source: http://www.americanpressinstitute.org/publications/reports/survey-research/personal-news-cycle/

That’s just a glimpse of what forms of media advertising are available. Now consider cable, satellite radio, Internet radio, online and website advertising, social media and more. It’s enough to make you cringe when thinking of the numerous methods available today to reach your audience. It’s also very easy for organizations to lose sight of their strategic focus when facing this increasingly fragmented advertising world. A business’ strategic approach needs to focus on their goals, their target audience and their methods of consumption, as well as a specific call-to-action that will impact that audience.

Developing an integrated and strategic communications approach, including multiple media touch points, as well as incorporating other forms of marketing and public relations allows businesses to create an impression with the audience by using fragmentation as an advantage. By focusing on the underlying goals and creating a specific and strategic approach, unique and targeted advertising opportunities exist to brand an organization and still maintain a reasonable budget.

In the instance of advertising, the point you should always consider before implementing a campaign – it’s better to buy 100 ads spread across five platforms reaching 50 percent of your audience if the total is 500,000 impressions than 100 ads on one platform reaching 75 percent of your audience if the total is 10,000 impressions. Taking into consideration consumer habits and consumption, having your campaign run in multiple forms of media may give the impression of a larger spend, hit the consumer on multiple platforms, and build the brand confidence by being included on media that the consumer already values or is loyal to.

Because of fragmentation, programmatic media buying driven by data continues to change media buying, pushes pricing and limits availability. We specifically combat this for clients by finding unique ways to break through that clutter while maximizing your budget, targeting the right audience for your goals and driving your key messages and calls-to-action for results.

If it’s time to evaluate your approach and ensure you’re using fragmentation to your advantage, call us for a marketing audit and analysis!

PersNewsCycle-Exhibit_01

http://www.americanpressinstitute.org/publications/reports/survey-research/personal-news-cycle/

 

Jimmie Cummings, Director of Government Services
Jimmie Cummings, Director of Government Services

In response to its growing government business, A. Bright Idea Advertising and Public Relations announced that Jimmie Cummings, has been hired to fill a newly created position within the firm as its Director of Government Services.

Cummings’, a former Army lieutenant colonel and public affairs officer, just recently retired after over 22 years of military service that included serving in positions at Fort George G. Meade, the Pentagon and numerous deployments to both Afghanistan and Iraq.

“Jimmie is an experienced leader and strategic communicator with a great deal of public affairs, crisis communication and media relations expertise in and around the military and government realm,” says T.J. Brightman, Principal/Vice President of Client Relations of A. Bright Idea.  “Strong and diverse talent is just one of the things we pride ourselves on at A. Bright Idea.  Jimmie will be another tremendous addition to our staff here and he was the ideal fit for our new position.”

Cummings’ most recent public affairs assignments included stops at Fort George G. Meade as the Executive Officer and Integration Chief of the Army Public Affairs Center, and a deployment to Kabul, Afghanistan, where he was a spokesman and press desk chief for both the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) and U.S. Army Forces-Afghanistan.  While deployed to Afghanistan for a year he provided public affairs support to numerous high profile and cultural sensitive incidents with global implications.  Cummings advised U.S. and ISAF senior leaders on public affairs strategies, crisis communication and media relations in a cultural diverse and sensitive environment as well as coordinated public affairs operations with the U.S. Embassy staff in Kabul.

Cummings was also previously posted at the Pentagon in the Office of the Chief of Public Affairs (OCPA) as an Army spokesman and public affairs advisor on issues regarding operations, weapons, environment, and technology to include acquisition and force modernization.  He is a native of Fairhope, Ala., and now resides in Catonsville, Md.

An award-winning advertising and public relations agency with locations in Bel Air, Md. and Sonoma, Calif. A. Bright Idea excels at identifying opportunities, generating ideas and executing customized solutions that deliver results for government, commercial and nonprofit clients including: U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency, U.S. Economic Development Administration, Department of Defense Joint Program Manager – Elimination (APG); National Institute of Corrections; DuPont; Stella Maris; Courtland Hearth and Hardware; Kenwood Kitchens; The John Carroll School; Yountville Chamber of Commerce; St. Francis Winery & Vineyards; Sonoma Valley Teen Services; Slavie Federal Savings Bank; Sonoma Valley Education Foundation; and Sonoma Valley Community Health Center among many others. For more information on A. Bright Idea and its services, visit www.abrightideaonline.com or email info@abrightideaonline.com.

 

Lost in translation/Perdido en traducción

abimaster | April 16, 2013

View article in Spanish

yohabloesIf you were not a Spanish-speaker, what would you assume the following Spanish word meant in English: “Embarazada?”

It sounds a lot like “embarrassed”, doesn’t it? This would be a false cognate since the actual meaning is “pregnant.” Imagine how truly embarrassed you would be if you accidentally used this word when trying to convey your feelings, but now the confused gentleman who you ran into is suspiciously looking at your stomach.

The Baltimore Public Relations Council (BPRC) used this example at its recent Multilingual Communications event, which focused on adapting communications to Spanish audiences in the Mid-Atlantic.

As a way to always keep our clients in front of changing market trends, A. Bright Idea consistently recognizes new ways to reach out to more audiences. The Hispanic/Latino communities are fast growing in the United States, especially in areas on the west coast and in the northeast.

What does this mean for businesses trying to reach this market? Well, truthfully this large and growing population may not respond to traditional marketing techniques. Businesses need to be receptive to alternative marketing strategies to tap into this growing demographic, including incorporating translated versions of campaigns or considering bi-lingual campaigns.

This brings us back around to the importance of translation. The BPRC referenced the Mortgage Disclosure Act in their recent seminar, in which officials filed the documents in a plain English-to-Spanish translation. One field asked for the individual’s verification of residence, meaning his/her address. Translated as “verificación de residencia”, many people thought the form was asking for information on their Green Cards, intimidating them from completing the form. “Verificación de residencia de su domicilio” would have conveyed the true intent.

It’s important for businesses to recognize the changing demographics of the country and how they may affect their target audience. If you haven’t done your research and you refer to your audience as Hispanics, this may confuse them as the United States government actually created the term, making it insignificant in Spain and Latin America. On the other hand, referring to your audience as Latinos would exclude everyone from Spain.

For businesses interested in embracing a broader cultural audience, accurate translation is a must. Be sure you work with your agency to complete accurate and in-depth research on your audience to validate whom you are reaching and that your message is as you intend.

Perdido en traducción

A veces personas en los Estados Unidos que no hablan español oyen algunas palabras y piensan que tienen significados incorrectos. Por ejemplo, muchas personas que no estudian español piensan que la palabra, “embarazada” significa “avergonzada” porque suena como la palabra en inglés. “Embarazada” es un cognado falso para esta razón.

Ellos están avergonzados de verdad cuando usan “embarazada” y luego aprenden que la palabra no tiene relación con los sentimientos; en realidad, ¡la persona con quien habló piensa que tendrá un bebe!

El Consejo de Relaciones Públicas en Baltimore (BPRC) usó este ejemplo en su evento recién, “Comunicaciones Políglotos,” que enfocó en adaptarse comunicaciones a las audiencias españoles en el Atlántico medio.

Para siempre exponer nuestros clientes a las tendencias cambiantes del campo, A. Bright Idea sistemáticamente reconoce maneras nuevas para llegar a nuevos públicos. Reconocemos que los Hispánico/Latino comunidades están creciendo muy rápido en los Estados Unidos, especialmente en áreas en la costa oeste y el noreste.

¿Qué significa tiene esta información para las empresas que quieren llegar a este mercado? Pues, con sinceridad, este grande y creciendo populación tal vez no responda a técnicas tradicionales de la comercialización. Las empresas tienen que estar receptivas a estrategias alternas de la comercialización para aprovechar este demográfico creciendo, incluyendo incorporar versiones traducidos de las campañas.

Esta cuestión nos trae a la importancia de la traducción. El BPRC citó un documento en su evento en que los oficiales escribieron en una traducción sencilla de español. Una pregunta fue para la verificación de residencia, que muchas personas hispánicas pensaron fue para información de sus tarjetas verdes. En actualidad, el documento solamente quiso la verificación de residencia de su domicilio.

Es importante para las impresas reconocer los demográficos cambiantes de este país y como pueden afectar sus públicos objetivos. No siempre pueden llamar los grupos que hablan español hispánicos porque esta palabra no tiene significado en sus países; el gobierno de los Estados Unidos creó esta palabra. Sin embargo, la clasificación de latino excluye todos que son de España.

Para las empresas que están interesadas en aprovechar un grande público cultural, la traducción fiel es muy importante. Tienen que trabajar con sus agencias de publicidad para completar la investigación a fondo en sus públicos para que validen a quien están hablando y que el mensaje es como la intención.

Media Training – the Do’s and Don’ts

abimaster | February 26, 2013

Many organizations welcome the opportunity to be highlighted with positive media attention, broadcasting their brand message among the target audiences. Conversely, there are also instances where organizations must face negative media attention, defend their brand, actions or operations tactfully in front of the court of public opinion. In both instances, when faced with media attention, its important for your organization’s leadership or spokesperson to be well versed and trained in media interviews.

At a recent event hosted by the Public Relations Society of America, Maryland Chapter (@PRSA_MD), our strategists exercised their media training skills, keeping abreast of the latest trends. We’ve shared a few of the basic points to keep in mind when preparing for media encounters. A good rule of thumb – consult your agency to develop a thorough media strategy, preparing you for positive or negative questions and appropriate responses.

Five steps to preparing for a media interview:

  1. Research the reporter/outlet prior to the interview
  2. Develop your core messages
  3. Prepare specifically for difficult questions
  4. Have your last question response ready – “I’d like to add…”
  5. Offer to provide additional information and have it on hand or readily available

The art of a good sound bite:

  • Make it locally relevant
  • Stay specific to your target audience
  • Offer something different – breaking news
  • Set up a visual
  • Provide an anecdote, analogy or third party endorsement

Do’s during an interview:

  • Be friendly
  • Translate technical terms
  • Build the relationship
  • Ask questions back
  • Provide follow up

Don’ts during an interview (and a few examples of an effective response):

  • Never say “no comment” (“I’m sorry I can’t respond to that question, but I can address..”)
  • Don’t go beyond your expertise (“I can’t speak to that but I can tell you…”)
  • Don’t speculate (“Here are the facts as I understand them…”)
  • Don’t bash the competition or complain (“Our company values dictate…”)
  • Avoid using or repeating negatives
  • Never go “off the record”
  • Avoid taking the bait (“Actually, contrary to that thought…”)
  • Don’t answer hypotheticals

If there is a media interview in your future or you’re looking to garner media attention, be sure your brand and your spokesperson are properly prepared. Need a little more training? Call one of our media experts for an in-depth media training session.