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Manipulating your mood to increase productivity

abimaster | November 25, 2013

Numerous studies demonstrate the effects that various aspects of the environment, including noise, sights and smells, have on the mind and the work that we produce.

CBS Sunday Morning recently ran a segment on how design colors the mind, by exploring the “drunk tank pink” color in a visiting football team’s locker room. The school purposefully selected the color for the locker room to weaken the visiting players before a game. Similarly the color was also noted for use in prisons to calm the violent inmates.

The story featured design psychologist Toby Israel, who placed a tree in her kitchen because of the positive connotations her memories as a child held of trees. She found when she spent much of her time in her kitchen, she felt happier and related that to the tree’s influence. Israel explores the psychology of design in her book, Some Place Like Home: Using Design Psychology to Create Ideal Environments, http://www.designpsychology.net/about.html#book.

Adam Alter, assistant professor of psychology and marketing at NYU, discusses the effects that different colors have on moods and productivity in his book titled Drunk Tank Pink, and Other Unexpected Forces That Shape How We Think. His research includes exploring how blue produces more creativity and red more caution and perhaps attention to detail. The book is an interesting read and offers additional insights about colors and factors that influence us (http://www.us.penguingroup.com/nf/Book/BookDisplay/0,,9781101605783,00.html)

As we all know and can likely see in our own offices, everyone has a different working style. What makes one person productive may drive the next up a wall!

One prime example of this is found in the story behind Coffitivity (coffitivity.com). A small group of people recognized their ability to think more creatively in a setting with a moderate volume of noise, such as a coffee shop. Their research proved that too much noise distracted most people and too little noise, while good for detail-oriented tasks, inhibited creativity.

They searched high and low for the right coffee shop and once they found it they recorded the noise of the every day hustle and bustle and posted it on a website they created for desk workers everywhere. The site has grown in popularity to points around the world, from Japan to Great Britain. Coffitivity offers a soundtrack of coffee shop noises at just the right level to help people to think outside of the box.

Many of us at ABI have different working styles—from sitting in rooms with the lights completely off to playing music over the speaker system or in our own headphones. Some of our walls are colored purple and we have a “chill area” with couches and a basketball hoop for those times when we just need to throw around some ideas with each other.

However unusual or interesting your work setting is, it’s important that it works for you. As new studies show, there are more and more tools to help perfect your work setting to spurn on productivity. Find out what’s right for you and share it – it may work for someone else too!

Ask yourself:

  • Do you work best with music or without?
  • How much lighting do you need to think clearly? Or how little do you need to think differently?
  • What colors do you like to look at while youwork?
  • Do you have images hanging around you that stimulate you in different ways?
  • Do the people around you distract you, or do their anecdotes provide much-needed breaks and stimulate creativity?
  • Are you more productive when people are chatting around you, or do you need total silence to concentrate?

Check out these sources:

http://coffitivity.com/

Drunk Tank Pink, and Other Unexpected Forces That Shape How We Think: http://www.us.penguingroup.com/nf/Book/BookDisplay/0,,9781101605783,00.html

Some Place Like Home: Using Design Psychology to Create Ideal Environments, http://www.designpsychology.net/about.html#book

A. Bright Idea, Archer St. office

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